June 25, 2004

Contact:

Jennifer Riordan 272-0261 office, 220-0702 cell

Bridgid Isworth 272 -3690

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

University of New Mexico Hospital Acting Radiology Supervisor Sarah Shortle has won the 2004 PIMA Medical Institute Clinical Teaching Award for the third time.

Ken McCormick of PIMA Medical Institute's Radiography School said that every year PIMA graduates in radiography vote for the instructor who they find to be most helpful, supportive and beneficial to the students' clinical education. For the third time in four years, Shortle earned the number one spot.                   

 "This award is something I am very proud of," said a modest Shortle, who feels that she plays only a minor role in her students' successes. "I find that students who do the best find it within themselves to succeed. My role is more like a cheerleader encouraging them to do well."

A New Mexico native and UNM alumna, Shortle was appointed Acting Supervisor in Radiology in the CAT scan and MRI Division at UNM Hospital this January. She has been employed at UNM Hospital since 1995 and began supervising in general radiology in 1998.

PIMA Medical Institute currently has more than 57 students in the radiography program. Each student participates in five rotations with various health care providers around New Mexico, for a six-week period each. The graduating students who vote for their favorite instructor have approximately 40 clinical instructors to choose from.

Shortle's enthusiasm for her role as teacher is something she feels is her greatest quality. But her enthusiasm is only a reflection of her students' commitment. "I like seeing students come into the hospital when they are awestruck and timid," she said. "They soon gain confidence and start to take on challenges. At some point, they begin performing with pride."

According to Shortle, because UNM Hospital is the only designated Level I Trauma Center in the state, students are exposed to a patient demographic unlike anywhere else in the region. "Students see patients with the most serious injuries, so the way the technologist approaches the exam is an art form," she said. "We accomplish the impossible."

Shortle's achievement is just another example of UNM Hospital's dedication to ensuring an efficient and accurate diagnosis and treatment for all patients at the hospital.

The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center is the largest integrated healthcare treatment and education complex in New Mexico. UNM Hospital is dedicated to setting exceptional teaching standards to which all UNM faculty can aspire.