July 27, 2007 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ALBUQUERQUE, NM – Rex Jung, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist and research scientist at the Mind Research Network (MRN) in Albuquerque, NM, was recently awarded a three-year, $600,000 grant from the John Templeton Foundation to pursue his pioneering work in the emerging field of Positive Neuroscience, or the study of what the brain does well.

A natural extension to Jung’s groundbreaking work in using advanced neuro-imaging to study human intelligence, he will investigate the origins and processes behind human creativity, including:
  • How is creativity manifest in the brain?
  • Are we all creative or only a special few?
  • How can individual creative capacity be encouraged and developed?
  • Are creativity and intelligence linked in any meaningful way?
Jung’s work is directly in line with the John Templeton Foundation mission: to serve as a philanthropic catalyst for discovery in areas engaging life’s biggest questions. These questions range from explorations into the laws of nature and the universe to questions on the nature of love, gratitude, forgiveness, and creativity. "The John Templeton Foundation is pleased to support Rex Jung's research at the Mind Institute on the science of creativity," notes Dr. Kimon Sargeant, Vice President of Human Sciences at the Foundation. “We expect that this innovative work will contribute to discoveries that, in the words of Sir John Templeton, 'unlock the potential of the brain.' "

“Creativity is a critically important human undertaking, involving playfulness with ideas, potential risk of failure or rejection, and ultimately confidence in the underlying value of an idea to change others’ lives in a positive way,” Jung asserts. “Humans find meaning in life when allowed to cultivate and express their individuality through creative outlets.

“We’re very fortunate to have the generous support of the John Templeton Foundation. There has been no systematic study of the neurological correlates associated with the creative process,” Jung adds. “Numerous case studies exist, but we are attempting to discover how creativity is manifested in the brain of each individual. There are numerous and significant societal benefits to understanding and nurturing creativity.”

Based in Albuquerque, NM, with collaborators around the world, the Mind Research Network (MRN) is a nonprofit scientific research organization dedicated to discovering the root causes of brain-based diseases and disorders, and quickly advance their prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

For more information on theNeuroscience of Creativity, please visitwww.themindinstitute.org. For more information on the John Templeton Foundation, please visitwww.templeton.org.