Sounds of Surgery

Listen to the songs that keep your surgeon focused in the operating room.

Have you ever wondered what your surgeon likes to listen to in the operating room? We went around The University of New Mexico Hospitals to check out what tunes are cranked up in the OR and why music helps medical staff during procedures. 

“I think the most important thing is to get everyone on the same page, right?” says general surgeon Stephen Lu, MD. “You want to creative a vibe that everyone is a team and we are all working together, and I think music is a huge part of that.”

Music can be heard pumping through speakers in mostly every operating room, whether in the main UNM Hospital or at the Outpatient Surgery and Imaging Services center (OSIS). We chatted with doctors specializing in everything from urology to anesthesiology and created a one of a kind “Sounds of Surgery” playlist. Give it a listen, or check out individual songs below.



Dr. David Pitcher - Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble - Voodoo Child 

Dr. John Russell - Steely Dan – Caves of Altamira

Dr. Shonte McKenzie – Michael Jackson - Butterflies

Dr. David Johannesmeyer - Hootie & the Blowfish – Hold My Hand 

Dr. Stephen Lu – Muddy Waters – Mississippi Delta Blues

Dr. Nichole Bordegaray – Young the Giant – My Body

Dr. Chris Arndt – Metallica – Enter Sandman

Dr. Matthew Wharton – George Strait – Amarillo By Morning

Dr. Andy Veitch – Foo Fighters – Everlong

Dr. Lev Deriy – Mozart – Marriage of Figaro - Overture

Dr. Brian Starr – Boston – More Than A Feeling

Dr. Julie Riley – U2 – With Or Without You

Dr. Michelle Khoo - Eagles - Hotel California

Dr. Neal Gerstein – John Cage - 4’33’’

Categories: Top Stories, UNM Hospitals, UNM Medical Group, Inc., Features, News You Can Use

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