The latest issue of U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of New Mexico School of Medicine fourth among U.S. medical schools for training primary care physicians. The 2002 "America's Best Graduate Schools" issue will be on newsstands Monday, April 8. This is the twelfth consecutive year the magazine has ranked the UNM School of Medicine among the top 15 primary care-oriented medical schools.

Additionally, The UNM SOM was ranked second for its Rural Medicine Program the eighth consecutive year this program has been ranked number two. Family Medicine was ranked fifth, up from sixth last year, according to a survey of medical school deans and senior faculty nationwide.

All 125 medical schools and 19 schools of osteopathic medicine accredited in the United States were considered for this year's ranking. The schools were ranked according to selected measures of academic quality. These include academic reputation, student selectivity, faculty resources, and the percentage of graduating physicians who go into the primary care specialties of family practice, internal medicine and pediatrics. Medical school deans and senior faculty nationwide ranked UNM's primary care curriculum second among primary care-oriented schools in terms of academic reputation.

"We are proud of our educational achievements at the UNM School of Medicine," said Paul Roth, M.D., dean of the SOM. "This national recognition is a tremendous compliment to our innovative curriculum, and our faculty's commitment to training outstanding physicians."

In addition, the SOM's Occupational Therapy program, last rated in 2001, was ranked 23rd, which puts it in the top third of OT programs nationwide.

"This is a relatively new program at UNM and in New Mexico," said Roth. "It has just recently offered a master's degree and we are very proud of its high ranking and accomplishment."

The UNM College of Nursing, which was last rated in 2000, is listed in the top 10 percent of nursing programs.