May 25, 2007

Contact: Sam Giammo, 272-3322

Three year’s of construction ends for UNM Hospital on the weekend of June 2-3 with the long anticipated move of patients and staff into the new UNM Hospital Bill and Barbara Richards Pavilion at 2100 Lomas Avenue, N.E.

The opening of the new UNM Children’s Hospital and Bill and Barbara Richardson Pavilion signals the creation of a new level of care for patients from Bernalillo County and New Mexico, one that integrates state-of-the art technology with a commitment to deliver that care efficiently and compassionately to the entire family. Faculty and staff, many of whom have been rehearsing the move for months, will carry out the move.

Altogether, the hospital expects to move nearly 250 patients during the two-day weekend.

On Saturday, hospital staff members will move approximately 70 Emergency Room patients, about 43 adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients, and some 50 pediatric ICU patients. Sunday will focus on moving around 35 new and soon-to-be moms and approximately 50 patients from the neonatal care unit.

The building has been planned for medical staff to work smarter, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The new pavilion will feature some $20 million in new equipment that allows for increased specialization, including sophisticated new radiology equipment. Patients will find a new level of specialization in the new pavilion with ICU suites dedicated specifically to adults, neuroscience patients, trauma and children, and, for the first time, three obstetrical operating rooms and six ORs dedicated just for pediatric cases.

A new emergency room, located near the corner of Lomas and Campus Drive, triples the amount of floor space for patients as well as the number of beds devoted exclusively to trauma patients in the Trauma Center.

UNM Hospital is the only Level One Trauma Center in New Mexico, which means many of the most critically ill and injured patients in the region are brought in for critical care seven days a week, 365 days a year. With the opening of the expansion, there will be almost twice the number ICU beds – treasured resources in a healthcare strapped state.

The ICU beds will be distributed as follows:

Before Expansion After Expansion

Trauma ICU 18 24 Medical ICU 15 24 Neurosciences ICU 10 24 Pediatrics ICU 12 20Neonatal Unit (ICU and subacute) 55 92All the additional beds in the new wing will be in private rooms. After the opening, the hospital will have a total of 430 beds, an increase of about 70 beds from the current number. More importantly, the square footage allocated per bed (and to families and other care givers) will be larger than any other hospital in the state.