Barbara Overman, Ph.D., CNM, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, has received an Excellence in Teaching award from the American College of Nurse Midwives Foundation (ACNM), Inc.

The award honors educators who teach, mentor and serve as role models for midwifery students. One teacher is selected annually from each of the accredited midwifery educational programs.

The American College of Nurse Midwives Foundation, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the provision of high quality maternal, newborn, and well-woman health services through the practice of midwifery.

Overman's students selected her for the award because of her demonstrated excellence in academic education, clinical education and research, her contribution to a positive learning environment, her support and enhancement of basic and lifelong learning skills and her support of the highest standards of midwifery practice.

On the UNM College of Nursing faculty since 1994, Overman teaches predominantly in the graduate program in the nurse-midwifery and nurse practitioner specialties. Overman teaches in the classroom and clinically at her faculty practice sites in the College of Nursing Faculty Practice (in the Northwest Valley) and with University Midwifery Associates at University Hospitals.

"I am particularly moved by this teaching award because I was nominated for it by my nurse-midwifery students," said Overman. "I am an educator because I am committed to the future. I am committed to a future where all women will have access to excellent health services, including an opportunity to elect nurse-midwifery care if they so choose. Our graduates do courageous and groundbreaking work in service of women and communities."

UNM College of Nursing Dean Sandra Ferketich said Overman is an outstanding faculty member and her contributions to students and the College are widely respected.

"Overman has been on the cutting edge of new programs in teaching recruitment of students, particularly minorities, to the midwifery concentration," Ferketich said. "Nurse midwifery is particularly important to New Mexico in our state, over 25 percent of women have a nurse midwife attending them during the prenatal and birth experience. Her commitment to education makes a tremendous contribution to our state."

Also involved in projects to increase access to education for students who live in rural areas or face other barriers to obtaining a traditional campus-based education, Overman was among the first "virtual professors" to teach web courses offered by the College of Nursing.
Contact: Lynn Melton, 272-3322